Health’s weekend read includes a survival story, longevity secrets and fatigue factors

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Fox News Digital publishes an array of health pieces all week long to keep you in the know on a range of wellness topics: disease prevention, nutrition, medical research, health care and much more — plus, personal stories of people and families overcoming great obstacles.

As you step into Sunday, check out some of the top stories of the week in Health that you may have missed or have been meaning to check out. 

These are just a few of what’s new, of course. 

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There are many more to see at http://www.foxnews/health

Dive right in.

Key longevity tips, insights into daily fatigue and a new study about deep brain stimulation are just a few of the offerings this week in Health.  (iStock)

Syndrome raises cancer risk

A little-known genetic condition could increase the risk of colorectal cancer by up to 80%. Two gastroenterologists reveal what to know about Lynch syndrome — including its connection to cancer — and identify who should get tested for it. Click here to get the story.

Man blood test

Lynch syndrome is a genetic disorder that makes people more susceptible to many different kinds of cancer. (iStock)

Weight-loss meds not standalone solution, experts say

Ozempic, Wegovy, Mounjaro and other weight-loss medications have spiked in popularity over the years, but people shouldn’t rely on them as the sole solution, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Discover what other lifestyle factors are needed for sustained results. Click here to get the story.

Girl stepping on scale

People on weight-loss journeys should not rely solely on anti-obesity medications, a national nutrition association said this week.  (iStock)

Woman survives after 25 minutes with no pulse

Cheryl Winston of Minnesota shared an amazing survival story to raise awareness of sudden cardiac arrest, which often strikes with little-to-no warning and accounts for about 15% of total heart-related fatalities. A cardiologist also weighed in with risk factors and prevention tips. Click here to get the story.

Cheryl Winston split

In 2020, Cheryl Jordan Winston was 48 years old when she collapsed in her bedroom after experiencing sudden cardiac arrest. She shared her story with Fox News Digital.  (Cheryl Jordan Winston)

Scent therapy helps reduce depression, study finds

In patients with depression, familiar scents were shown to alleviate symptoms and improve memory, a study found. Psychiatrists explain the connection between aromatherapy and mental health. Click here to get the story.

Woman aromatherapy

A familiar scent could help individuals with depression recall memories more easily than verbal cues, according to a recent study. (iStock)

Secrets of longevity revealed

These five simple lifestyle choices could add years to your life, according to Dr. Gary Small, a brain health expert at Hackensack Meridian Health. Get the details on the factors that are within your control. Click here to get the story.

Older woman with weight

Numerous studies have linked regular physical activity to a longer life expectancy. (iStock)

Deep brain stimulation identifies sources of disorders

Researchers have pinpointed dysfunctions in the brain that are linked to Parkinson’s, OCD, Tourette’s syndrome and other diseases. Scientists at Mass General Brigham and other neurologists weigh in on how the study could impact treatment for cognitive disorders. Click here to get the story.

Woman brain electrodes

The researchers implanted electrodes into the brains of each participant (not pictured) and used special software to determine which brain circuits were dysfunctional in each of the four disorders. (iStock)

Self-compassion key to mental health, researchers say

The ultimate self-care strategy is to practice short acts of self-compassion each day, according to a study from the University of California Berkeley. Researchers share how the daily affirmation practice was associated with greater self-compassion, emotional well-being and reduced stress. Click here to get the story.

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Reasons why you’re always tired

Daytime fatigue has many causes — and some may surprise you. Sleep experts shared four of the most common reasons for sub-par slumber. Click here to get the story.

Woman tired on couch

Some 40% of adults say that fatigue interferes with their daily activities at least three days a week, according to the National Sleep Foundation. (iStock)

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews.com/health.

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