Cat Janice, singer with cancer who went viral for dedicating song to son, dies at age 31

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Local doctor discusses symptoms of Sarcoma


Local doctor discusses symptoms of Sarcoma

08:02

Singer Cat Janice, who went viral for dedicating one of her last songs to her young son, has died at age 31, her family said on Wednesday.

In a statement posted to her Instagram account, her family said the artist, whose real name is Catherine Janice Ipsan, died Wednesday morning surrounded by her loved ones. A cause of death was not given, but Ipsan had previously been diagnosed with sarcoma, a form of cancer that develops in the bones or soft tissue, according to Mayo Clinic.

“We are eternally thankful for the outpouring of love that Catherine and our family have received over the past few months,” the family wrote. “Cat saw her music go places she never expected and rests in the peace of knowing that she will continue to provide for her son through her music. This would not have been possible without all of you.”

Her family said her brother will manage operations involving her music going forward and there will be “some more art that she wants to share too.”  

After learning her cancer was terminal, Ipsan garnered attention on TikTok and other social media platforms when she asked people to stream her song “Dance You Outta My Head” so that the royalties could go to her 7-year-old son, Loren. The song was released in January and climbed all the way to the top of Billboard’s ranking of the most popular songs on TikTok in the U.S. 

“I never thought I would live to see the day where my art is #1 Billboard charting,” she wrote in a Feb. 15 post on Instagram. “Thank you. Thank you for giving us this moment at such a time.” 

From hospice, an alt-pop singer releases her final song  for her son
Singer Cat Janice seen here with her 7-year-old son, Loren, on January 25, 2024, in Annandale, Virginia. 

Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images


Sarcoma, sometimes referred to as the “forgotten cancer,” happens when malignant cells form in the bones or soft tissues of the body. When it comes to symptoms, Dr. Daniel Lerman, a Colorado-based orthopedic surgeon, said that people should look out for a deep, throbbing pain that you can’t quite explain, almost like a toothache.

“If you have a deep, achy, throbbing pain for a prolonged time, don’t dismiss it. It’s worth getting it checked out,” Dr. Lerman told CBS Colorado. “You need to listen to your body, but also be an advocate for yourself and for your loved ones.”

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